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Gravity
#1
I've searched the forums and run each demo scene.  Are there any gravity examples?

For example:  

1)  Place a sphere at point A - the sphere should eventually rest at point C.
2)  Place a sphere at point A and B - they collide at point C - bounce from the impact - and come to rest at point C.

Any guidance before purchasing would be great.

   
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#2
Hi,
Are you trying to generate a U shaped mesh to have a set of balls fall rolling on it?
If yes, then the scene "Physics: Interaction with a Curvy generated mesh" in the WebGL demo does something similar.
If no, could you explain to me a little more what you try to do?
Thanks for your interest in Curvy, and have a nice day.
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#3
(08-09-2018, 11:49 AM)_Aka_ Wrote: If yes, then the scene "Physics: Interaction with a Curvy generated mesh" in the WebGL demo does something similar.

That scene from my vantage point:  moving the ball to that first slope should have caused it to roll...  I then assumed it was just momentum from the keypress.

Yes, either a set of sphere or a single.  I need to simulate the sphere rolling down the U shaped mesh.  A single sphere would certainly pass point C - but eventually would settle at point C.  A set of sphere released at the same time should collide at point C.

The sphere will have a RigidBody with an optional physics material.  Of course, this is how i would like things to work - this might not be reality though.
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#4
(08-10-2018, 11:49 AM)devomage Wrote: A set of sphere released at the same time should collide at point C

Just in case it is your first project with such physics, keep in mind that the reality will be different from theory, because of floating point imprecision, error accumulation, and 3d meshs being different from the mathematical surface they are meant to represent (because of tesselation). So having precise physics might be difficult, especially if you are networking it, but it is worth giving a try.

Here is a clip of a test scene I made, that does what I think you want: an U-shaped tube made with Curvy, and two balls dropped from opposite sides.

   
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#5
Your example is correct - however, it looks "artificial" without proper physics.

I will spend more time with research and start a new thread if needed.  Appreciate your efforts --
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#6
The physics were using non earthly gravity value, just to make things easier to show in a gif.
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